The Strawman. How The Government Owns You Legally

 

 

 Meet your Strawman

The story of how everyone has a straw man created for them at birth and how it is used to collect revenue for your government. A fun and informative animation made in the spirit of freedom. Please spread and upload with credits intact also link back to our channel if you do. Hi-res and mobile versions are avilable for download from our website.

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What Is a Strawman?

From: Wikipedia.com

A straw man is a common form of argument and is an informal fallacy based on giving the impression of refuting an opponent’s argument, while actually refuting an argument that was not advanced by that opponent.[1]

The so-called typical “attacking a straw man” argument creates the illusion of having completely refuted or defeated an opponent’s proposition by covertly replacing it with a different proposition (i.e. “stand up a straw man”) and then to refute or defeat that false argument (“knock down a straw man”) instead of the original proposition.[2][3]

This technique has been used throughout history in polemical debate, particularly in arguments about highly charged emotional issues where a fiery, entertaining “battle” and the defeat of an “enemy” may be more valued than critical thinking or understanding both sides of the issue.

In the United Kingdom the argument is also known as an Aunt Sally, after the pub game of the same name where patrons throw sticks or battens at a model of an old woman’s head.[4][5]

Orgins

As a fallacy, the identification and name of straw man arguments are of relatively recent date, although Aristotle makes remarks that suggest a similar concern;[6] Douglas Walton identified “the first inclusion of it we can find in a textbook as an informal fallacy” in Stuart Chase‘s Guides to Straight Thinking from 1956 (p. 40).[6][7] However, Hamblin‘s classic text Fallacies (1970) neither mentions it as a distinct type, nor even as a historical term.[6][7] The idea of “men of straw” who can be knocked down by “the lightest puff, the smallest breath of truth,” erected by invaders upon a field to scare away others who might join the movement, can be found in Victoria C. Woodhull’s “The Scare-Crows of Sexual Slavery”, written in 1873.[8]

The origins of the term are unclear. The usage of the term in rhetoric suggests a human figure made of straw which is easily knocked down or destroyed, such as a military training dummy, scarecrow, or effigy.[9] The rhetorical technique is sometimes called an Aunt Sally in the UK, with reference to a traditional fairground game in which objects are thrown at a fixed target. One common folk etymology is that it refers to men who stood outside courthouses with a straw in their shoe in order to indicate their willingness to be a false witness.[10]

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